Ann Gale

Portrait with Grid, 2014 oil on masonite 14×11″

Portrait with Grid, 2014 oil on masonite 14×11″

Peter Turning, 2013 Oil on linen on covered masonite 14 x 11 inches

Peter Turning, 2013 Oil on linen on covered masonite 14 x 11 inches

Peter 14 x 11 inches graphite on paper 2014

Peter 14 x 11 inches graphite on paper 2014

Rachel, 2007 Oil on canvas 58 x 46 inches

Rachel, 2007 Oil on canvas 58 x 46 inches

“Space Between” oil on mylar, 14 x 11” 2012

“Space Between” oil on mylar, 14 x 11” 2012

Self Portrait with Blue Stripes, 2008 Oil on Masonite 14 x 11 Inches

Self Portrait with Blue Stripes, 2008 Oil on Masonite 14 x 11 Inches

(From an interview with Ann Gale, http://paintingperceptions.com/featured-interviews/interview-with-ann-gale)

LG: How do you approach measuring when painting? Is the underlying grid important or do you prefer to do it all more by sight or feel? Do your marks result from measurement or relating forms to an underlying structure or grid? Some of the marks seem to have little to do with a grid and are more turbulent while others seem meditative. Is this something you can talk to us about?

AG: Some of it is very much about the grid, so I was happy to hear that word in your question. It’s always there in the rectangle, very present in my observation. I think it helps to measure against it. To see a gesture compared to a vertical is much more sensitive.

So I’ll follow a lot of those, like plum-lines and horizontals, through the picture to try to see the gesture of the figure, from the knees up through the body to the top of the head. I can get a long measurement with some of the grid lines and I do that a lot in my drawings too. Actually, it’s easier in drawings because I can pull that skinny little line through anything. I’m trying to learn that in my paintings.

Other things are not so much a grid but a linear movement where I’ll follow something that is like a ribbon through space. I think it’s the direction my eye is taking. I might go from the floor, over someone’s lap and into the background. I think of it as kind of a path through the painting and through the figure. I’ll repeat that several times, sometimes I’ll cover an area of the painting so that I can travel through the painting and avoid filling in, or getting stuck on some nameable object, a chair or a head.

As I’m observing, I’m trying not to follow the things with names, I’m trying to follow my way between them and through them. So I’m thinking of either that grid that hangs through everything or these other paths that are available that move through the figure and space.

About viewfromaburrow

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